In-store inventory: Curating to compete against ecommerce’s endless aisle

 

 

One of the most difficult things for a retailer is understanding what items to have in-store and which could be successfully handled in online as part of an endless aisle strategy.

For brick and mortar retailers, physical in-store space is finite, and what’s available must be used effectively.

That is particularly challenging as brick and mortar retailers face the vast breadth of inventory that ecommerce competitors offer.

However, sometimes that enormous ocean of product can overwhelm customers.

 

Get insight into inventory

 

Traditional retailers can augment what’s in-store with online offerings, but one of the highlights of being brick and mortar is the ability to offer “look and feel” in a curated environment.

The “inner sanctum” of any retail store is the inventory area.

Making the most of that space will save any retailer money.

Storing inventory and supplies in a warehouse comes at a cost, especially if it eats away at display/retail space. Off-site inventory incurs rental and transportation costs, as well.

However, retailers must have “the right” inventory on hand so shoppers don’t leave stores empty-handed.

Retail inventory management keeps the backend in line with the front-end’s needs.

Good retail management software helps you see:

  • The quantities of each product in stock
  • A sense of when reordering is necessary
  • The number of items that should be ordered regularly
  • Best selling items
  • Items that are unpopular
  • The amount of inventory on-hand is adequate
  • If overstocking is a concern
  • If your inventory space is not big enough

Getting a handle on inventory management affects a business’ bottom-line, allowing it not only to continue operating, but also to grow.

Without a strong inventory management process, it’s easy to lose track of stock.

Mismanaged items are more easily stolen and seem to vanish without a trace – precisely because there is no traceability.

In a worst-case scenario, a retailer spends money on unknowingly replacing stolen goods, while paying to store an item that was ordered to replace a product that was never actually sold.

Additionally, not having a firm grasp on inventory levels can also mean running out of stock more easily, missing sales opportunities.

Today, many retailers offer a buy online, pickup in store option.

Not having inventory in sync with on-hand counts is a customer experience disaster.

In addition to keeping accurate inventory numbers, some stock management can be handled within the product displays.

The cost of storage depends upon the amount of inventory needed to be stored.

Planograms, or the blueprint of a store’s layout, can help retailers improve sales with visual merchandising.

 

Digitize the in-store experience

 

Today’s shoppers are used to a much higher level of convenience, choice and accessibility than in the past, because of the influence ecommerce has had on retail.

Therefore, it’s important for stores to “digitize” by providing personal recommendations, customer reviews and increased assortments, so that when customers enter a physical store, their expectations are met.

Planograms help to arrange merchandise in a way that catches the customer’s eye, organizing in a way that provides more room on your shelves, and helps estimate how much to place on the sales floor.

Brick and mortar retailers should focus on effective use of inventory space.

Too much is as detrimental as too little.

By employing retail management technology to count and manage products, they can offer what customers want, when they want it, while maintaining a healthy profit margin.

 

 

 

Is your omnichannel meeting customers’ expectations?

 


 
Today's customers often want a fast, efficient shopping experience, and retailers are increasingly providing omnichannel experiences that are refined to meet those needs.

While retailers hope to gain revenue and gain efficiencies in marketing, what do customers view as a successful omnichannel experience?
 

Origin of omnichannel

 
Ten years ago, a retailer might offer an online as well as a brick and mortar experience, hoping to catch shoppers who couldn't make it to the store.

In essence, e-commerce began as a way retailers could extend their shopping hours.

Today, for many, e-commerce has evolved into a preferred means of shopping for many common items, but it doesn't replace traditional shopping entirely.

That's where a strong omni-channel strategy comes into play.

Clothing, electronics, furnishings — those are items that customers typically want to see in-person before buying.

They may not want to purchase them in-person, however.

Additionally, shoppers often want opinions of their friends before committing to those types of purchases.

Best-in-class omnichannel retailing serves shoppers through multiple sales channels—primarily online, in-store and social media — in a way that is presented cohesively, no matter how or where the customer journey began.
 

The reality today

 
From the customer's point of view, most businesses currently provide a multi-channel experience.

There is a brick and mortar store, a website, a Facebook page, a Twitter account, and, perhaps, a blog.

Those platforms engage and connect with customers, but rarely as a cohesive unit.

In most cases, there is no seamless experience or consistent messaging across channels.

Many times, "buy online, pickup in store," or BOPIS, is unavailable, because inventory systems are disparate.
 

What it takes to do omnichannel well

 
A successful strategy should build a coherent, aligned experience across multiple platforms and involve stakeholders including the product, marketing, sales, customer support and customer journey teams.

Each shopping channel should work concurrently to provide a truly powerful experience through many shopping touch points.

Among the most important areas to align include:

  • Inventory: Online reflects in-store stock
  • Rewards programs: Use and earn points online and in-store
  • Shipping and delivery: Delivery status can be checked in-store or online

While the biggest changes have come primarily from the largest retailers, many smaller companies have actually driven the customer experience crusade, using social media platforms to engage directly with shoppers.

Start-up retailers generally have omni-channel "baked in" as a foundation, leaving larger companies challenged to compete.

Retail consultant McKinsey notes that an omni-channel transformation is the only way for a company to address rising complexity, provide an excellent customer experience, and manage operations costs.

A true omni-channel strategy improves communication within the retailer itself, because different departments are routinely updating statuses that are then reflected throughout the internal supply chain.

As a result, the strategy better meets the needs of today's customer.

The rise of voice-enabled commerce in ubiquitous retail

 

 

Shopping is an increasingly “invisible” activity, embedding itself seamlessly into new digital and physical channels, using ever-more natural gestures and simple conversations.

 Gesture recognition helps retailers gauge shoppers’ real interest 

For example, a mom goes for an afternoon walk with her child. She notices she could use some silicone straws for their water bottles, and asks Alexa to place the order.

As they walk to the park, Mom sees an ad for a pair of running shoes. She takes a picture on her phone, successfully searches the Web and finds the item for sale, and makes a purchase just before greeting her friends at the playground.

On the way home, she sees a local restaurant is having a farm-to-table event that evening, so she sends invites to her husband and another couple to meet there.

The idea that people can shop virtually all the time from any location with an Internet connection is referred to as ubiquitous shopping, and is seen especially in the rising use of voice-enabled commerce.

According to Accenture, 94% of retail executives believe ubiquitous shopping represents a complete transformation or significant change for the industry.

The survey found that while two-thirds (65%) of industry executives view online commerce as the driving characteristic of ubiquitous shopping, and over half (53%) cite mobile purchases as key. Just one third (33%) say new technology such as voice commerce is top of mind.

However, Accenture forecasts that the next big thing in shopping is voice recognition technology, and suggests that retail executives are under-estimating voice-enabled commerce.

In the U.S., one in every five households with a wireless internet connection is already using a smart speaker, making nearly 19 million homes ready for voice shopping.

 The first step to recognizing customers with AI 

However, last August, TheInformation.com reported that only 2% percent of people with Amazon-Alexa enabled devices made a purchase via voice and of those, “90% didn’t try it again.”

Still, the technology is there, ready and waiting. It may just be slightly ahead of its time.

Considering that today it's possible to jump into a Ford, have Alexa ask Starbucks to start an order, swing by the drive-thru, pick up and be back on the road, it seems as though that 2% will grow to a far greater number in a very short time.

 

 

Brick & mortar borrowed this from online retail and increased revenue by 5.1%

 

 

Brick and mortar has learned a thing or two from online retail, and last December shoppers took a meaningful notice.

By focusing on and improving their buying online and picking up in-store (BOPIS, also called “click and collect”) offerings, retailers experienced a never-before-seen surge in shoppers using the service.

Retailers saw the strongest holiday sales growth in six years, with revenue increasing 5.1% to more than $850 billion this year, according to Mastercard Spending Pulse.

Online shopping also saw large gains of 19.1% compared to 2017. And established brands were a significant part of that good news: Walmart, Kohl's and Macy's reported healthy sales and saw stock gains.

 

Giving shoppers anytime access to goods pays off

By offering true 24/7 access to goods, retailers were able to provide what customers wanted at a time that was convenient for them to shop.

For those who wanted to do some thoughtful shopping but were short on time during regular business hours, being able to browse selections from the comfort of a sofa or bed, pay and pick them up when convenient added some much-appreciated stress relief during what can be a very busy season.

“By combining the right inventory with the right mix of online versus in-store, many retailers were able to give consumers what they wanted via the right shopping channels,” said Steve Sadove, senior advisor for Mastercard and former CEO and Chairman of Saks Inc., in a release.

And Frank Layo, managing director at Kurt Salmon, part of Accenture Strategy, told CNBC in an interview that the top five "click and collect" or BOPIS retailers were Bed Bath & Beyond, Best Buy, Kohl's, Target and the Home Depot.

BOPIS was up 47% this holiday season compared with last year, according to analyst reports.

For example, Target reported that it expected order pickup volume would triple this holiday season compared with last year's.

 

Incremental sales increase from wider product offerings

During the past few seasons, brick-and-mortar retailers have worried about being bested by their e-commerce competitors and for good reason.

Online stores are conveniently open around the clock, offer a level of personalization and can provide an inventory with variety that couldn't be accommodated with the footprint of any department store.

Click and collect changes the game, however.

Many stores now let shoppers view inventory in stock, allowing them to place an order that is ready for pick up within a couple of hours.

But they also feature the ability to shop from a wider variety and have that item shipped to the store for pickup. The shopper saves on delivery charges, can see the product before accepting it and is able to take advantage of a wider selection than is offered on the retail floor.

And the stores benefit from incremental sales at pickup too. For example, Kohl's reports an average attachment rate of 20% to 25% for additional in-store purchases.

Retailers this past holiday season seem to have taken the adage, "Nothing ever changes if nothing ever changes" to heart.

 

Is it really discovery shopping if Amazon found it for you?

Effects of data-driven curation on discovery experiences

 

 

Remember when a trip to the store could yield a new discovery -- an unplanned purchase but one that delighted the customer?

Ecommerce handles specific shopping needs seamlessly and efficiently: Search for “motorized pedal exerciser” and buy it in less than three minutes.

But so-called "discovery" shopping — such as figuring out what to get your hard-to-shop-for great aunt for her 90th birthday — is much easier to do through brick and mortar browsing.

 

Selling discovery experiences

The world of in-store commerce offers shoppers an experience, an interaction with others that can't be replicated online.

In the best-case scenario, the experience is enjoyable and memorable, one that a shopper wants to repeat with that retailer and emulate at others.

No matter how good a recommendation engine or a chatbot is, the feeling a shopper gets from finding a perfect product can only come from shopping in a physical store.

That is, until an online retailer aggregates its collected data and presents it in a physical store as a curated collection to reach a specific audience.

If an online behemoth parlayed all the knowledge it has gleaned from the data it has gathered about its ecommerce shoppers, that retailer could be very well positioned against its competitors, online as well as brick and mortar.

 

Peer-based discoveries

Amazon has recently opened a handful of Amazon 4-Star physical locations, which are designed with discovery in mind. All the items are top-rated, and the selection will change frequently, depending on their customers' ratings.

The first, in the SoHo section of New York City, offers at-a-glance products that are "popular in SoHo," "frequently bought together" and "most wished for," among other categories.

Amazon can easily put these displays together due to the data it collects on its online shoppers. And that data collection continues to grow offline.

Amazon-exclusive products are also available, and Prime members get the Amazon price, while non-members pay MSRP. Signing up for Prime in the store not only provides customers lower pricing, but also adds to Amazon's information database.

Shoppers can see how many ratings a product has received and what the average rating is. Others have reviews displayed nearby.

The combination of a physical location and all that aggregated data is a fierce combination.

 

Personal discoveries

However, "discovery shopping" is more than simply sorting through trends and selecting from the most popular items.

If that were the case, small, specialized shops and boutiques would not be frequented, shunned for larger, on-trend department stores.

But the opposite is largely the case.

Discoverers aim to find the one-of-a-kind for a more personal gift or to satisfy their own personal taste. That's more likely to be found in a shop on Main Street than online, because it is not mass produced, so it therefore can't have hundreds of reviews.

 

In the end, Amazon's strategy for its physical stores, and any others like it, will mirror that of large department stores that have built a decent ecommerce channel.

Those stores, such as Macy's, Target and Kohl's, can also look at their data, slice it up regionally and offer only those products based on that data.

While not quite as personal as the local shop on the corner, there's a huge opportunity for larger companies to meet their customer needs more precisely.

 

The rise of subscription e-commerce

 

 

Shoppers want personalized experiences that are convenient and easy. Subscription commerce fulfills that need.

Of course, for retailers, that one, seemingly simple desire can be filled in a multitude of ways, which can sometimes be at odds with each other.

For example, a personal shopping experience may mean going to a neighborhood store, being greeted by name and engaging with an associate who knows your shopping history by heart.

It can also mean logging onto a favorite online store, also being greeted by name, but then interacting with a recommendation engine and having a package shipped directly to you.

When customers want certain items on a regular basis, subscription commerce is bridging the gap, letting customers feel a personal connection without having to expend the effort of a physical visit or performing endless online searches.

With subscription commerce, or "subcom," retailers can delight customers while simultaneously benefitting from a source of recurring revenue.

Subscriptions have exploded in popularity, growing from $57 million in sales in 2010 to more than $2.6 billion by 2016.

McKinsey & Company reported that 15 percent of online consumers signed up for subscription services in 2017.

Retailers offering such services report having a much closer idea of warehouse staff and stock requirements, delivery destinations, shipping costs and likely future income.

Retailers generally have a greater sense of predictability, but in the most popular programs, what is delivered often includes a surprise—a carefully curated amalgam of products that the retailer has determined the customer will want.

The concept is popular because it's fun and customers believe they are getting good value.

While shoppers can order specific items for delivery at specific times by subscription, (e.g., Harry's Razors), samplings and curation are two common types of subscription services.

 

Samplings

Birchbox (cosmetics), Graze (snacks), and BarkBox (dog supplies) are among the most popular sampling services that consumers can sign up for by subscription.

Birchbox, which launched the curated sample subscription box trend in 2010, mails subscribers four to five new beauty samples and lifestyle items to try for a $10 monthly fee.

Curation is based on shopper profiles submitted by users on the Birchbox website.

Retailers earn recurring income on these subscriptions of sample products; they pay little or nothing for the products they ship on a regular schedule.

Customers join the service and understand it's typically a sampling of trial-size products; those that aren't desired are simply discarded rather than returned.

For example, Birchboxes can't be returned. By offering trials of popular products, retailers hope to increase product interest that will carry over to their online stores.

The boxes offer retailers opportunities to delight customers, with curation, personalization, and pricing strategy being crucial factors.

 

Curation

Curated services are personalized with the shopper's profile in mind.

For example, customers of the higher-end clothing subscription Stitch Fix, benefit from a personal stylist who selects several pieces of clothing based on the shopper's style profile.

Upon receipt of the shipment, the customer has three days to decide what to buy and what to send back.

By sending the stylist feedback, shoppers can receive more personalized selections the next time.

Subscription services answer customers' calls for more personalized offerings.

Shoppers are willing to pay for convenience and subscription services provide that as well as an element of surprise.

Successful retailers understand that subscriptions aren't simply fulfilling a request — that can be accomplished with any sales transaction.

The surprise element of curation and sample subscriptions makes shoppers feel as though they're getting gifts from close friends who understand the recipients' taste — despite the recipients having placed the orders themselves.

The experience delights the customer, and therefore, the trend is likely to continue to be popular well into 2019.

 

 

 

Mobile Apps: Building Unified Loyalty In-Store and Online

 

 

Loyal customers are repeat customers.

They are particularly valued because the cost of customer acquisition is high.

However, loyalty is not just about repeat business – otherwise, all repeat customers would be considered loyal, and they aren’t.

 

Repeat customers vs loyal customers

 

The difference is that loyal customers make a conscious choice to do business with a company even when a less expensive, more convenient or higher quality alternative is available somewhere else.

So why are customers loyal to a retailer when sometimes it seems illogical?

Because of that store’s superior customer service.

Creating an easy, frictionless shopping experience makes customers happy -- and that satisfaction can be parlayed into loyalty.

 

Converting online browsers into in-store customers

 

Only a few years back, brick and mortar stores were dying on the vine.

Customers were going online, finding the lowest price for items, checking them out in stores but buying them via e-commerce.

Soon, though, traditional retailers realized that those shoppers who were browsing but not buying could be turned into customers -- after all, they were in the store already.

Shoppers were saying they enjoyed the efficiency of e-commerce, but they also wanted to touch and feel certain items.

And other items benefited from having knowledgeable salespersons educate shoppers on features, uses, etc.

 

Building loyalty through mobile apps

 

Retailers are answering customers’ demands for more efficiency by adding mobile apps to their sales processes.

App Annie, an app market data and insights company, tracks usage and consumption for the average smartphone owner:

  • Average daily use: 2 hours and 15 minutes
  • Average number of apps installed: 60 to 90
  • Average number of apps used monthly: 30
  • Average number of apps launched daily: 9

With so many mobile phones in use, retailers are finding that the mobile app customers could be a key to increasing brand awareness, driving sales and increasing mindshare.

A survey of more than 500 mobile shoppers by research company Clutch, found that not only are consumers using e-commerce apps, but they’re also looking for features that go beyond browsing and buying: “Consumers want an easy, frictionless, and entertaining experience when using apps.”

Clutch noted that shoppers use e-commerce apps primarily for four reasons:

  1. To receive deals and offers (68%)
  2. For the flexibility to buy at any time (64%)
  3. To compare products and prices (62%)
  4. To save time at the store (54%)

 

The problem with mobile shopping apps

 

Too few retailers create apps with the consumer in mind.

What shoppers want to do with a retail app is what should drive app creation.

Retailers should develop a focused strategy when developing an app that targets the way shoppers use apps.

Many shoppers want apps that personalize the in-store experience, such as deal alerts, which are enabled when the customer is inside the physical store.

Also, Clutch reported that if an app syncs a business’ loyalty rewards, more than 80% of consumers would use the feature.

Mobile shopping apps are the future of unified retail.

Retailers should continue to increase their capabilities according to shoppers’ requests and usage patterns, and look to include discounts, rewards, personalization, and even augmented reality in the near future.

 

Has Walmart cracked the omnichannel challenge?

 

 

Offering customers the ability to seamlessly move from online shopping to brick and mortar and back to online is the crux of the omnichannel experience.

Shoppers can buy products 24/7, go to a physical store for an in-person inspection, and then make the purchase using either channel based on convenience.

Increasing numbers of retailers are incorporating omnichannel aspects into their business plans, including buy online, pickup in store (BOPIS), endless aisles and curbside pickup.

Creating efficient and profitable omnichannel strategies is a challenge for any business, yet their importance is well understood.

A recent study by Multichannel Merchant and Brightpearl found that 87% of retailers agree omnichannel is a critical business function, yet only 8% believe they are proficient at implementation.

That indicates a long road ahead: Retailers are clearly overcome with the technical challenges and customer expectations that are large parts of implementing an omnichannel presence.

 

What Walmart is doing

 

Recently, retail powerhouse Walmart has taken up the omnichannel challenge.

Walmart introduced its shoppers to a new e-commerce feature: 3D virtual shopping. Viewers can "walk through" an apartment outfitted with home goods sold by Walmart.

Certain items are designated as being available through the retailer, and by selecting an icon, the shopper can view a brief description and is offered an option to place it into a shopping cart.

The experience offers shoppers the benefit of seeing how items look in context: How an object will look in a home, rather than on a shelf in a store with dozens of similar items next to it.

Furniture stores have been using similar staging techniques forever. But Walmart, like other big-box retailers, has no space to devote to setting up faux living rooms, kitchens, bedrooms and bathrooms.

So using e-commerce site — where space is plentiful — is the perfect solution.

The apartment showcases roughly 70 different items, and it is easy to see how the virtual environment can be used an infinite number of ways.

Walmart plans to add "Buy the Room," which lets customers add groups of coordinated products to their shopping carts at one time.

Aimed initially at shoppers for dorm-room items, five curated collections will be offered.

Such unique online experiences can help create a seamless omnichannel experience for shoppers.

For example, a mom and daughter go shopping for the daughter's first apartment. They arrive at Walmart, but are overwhelmed by the selection and can't visualize how items will look in an apartment.

Pulling up walmart.com on a mobile phone offers a 3D apartment tour, helping put the items in a more familiar environment.

Some of the items can be purchased while they are in the store — and others may be only available online.

Both sales channels are used to provide the customers exactly the items they desire.

 

Customers want a better, integrated shopping experience

 

A recent Accenture study found that 32% of consumers said that the integrating the mobile, website and in-store shopping experience is the biggest improvement retailers need to make.

The old “customer-centric,” multichannel approach is being replaced by a more assertive, customer-driven approach.

It is not enough for companies to simply know each customer, but they must also respond dynamically to customers who are constantly re-evaluating what they want to buy and where they want to buy it.

 

 

 

Photo by Nicole Honeywill on Unsplash

Retailers going omnichannel pass on tech benefits to customers

 

 
In-store customers account for 50% of all eCommerce activity, research by Salesforce found, so closing the online-offline gap is critical for customer experience.

In response, retailers pursuing omnichannel with Retail Pro are turning their technology gains into customer-facing conveniences for unified commerce that puts shoppers first.

Here are three ways you can pass on the benefits of full data visibility in Retail Pro to your customers.

 

1: Show store inventory availability online

 
79% of shoppers research products online before buying in stores. Analysts are calling the trend ROPO – Research Online, Purchase Offline.

With so many shoppers choosing this blended approach to shopping, you can use your inventory data in Retail Pro to give customers online visibility into a product’s availability at their local store and secure the sale.

 

2: Make personalized recommendations

 
Though personalized recommendations generate only 7% of online visits, they result in 26% of online conversions – well worth the effort.

You can analyze customer history data in Retail Pro to personalize your marketing with recommendations based on items they recently or frequently purchased.

Effective recommendations are those that complement what the shopper already purchased from you, rather than simply other iterations of items the shopper has already browsed or bought.

 

3: Blend channels into one holistic shopping experience

 
For on the go consumers, the real shopping is done on your website.

They see your store as a fulfillment center where they will try on or pick up what’s needed on their way to do other things.

Integrated ecommerce and store POS can help you create a streamlined experience for these busy shoppers: shoppers can plan ahead and fill up their online shopping cart, and then access it at your store POS to complete the purchase and get the goods.

 

Omnichannel at Kanmo Group

 

Kanmo Group took this kind of holistic approach to managing data with Retail Pro Prism.

"To truly benefit from our omnichannel strategy, Kanmo Group has to look beyond simply engaging customers through offline and online means. When you look at the customer behavior in Southeast Asia, you will see that shoppers love to fill up their basket online – but they still prefer to complete the purchase in physical stores," commented Bhavin Patel, Omnichannel Director of Kanmo Group. "We want to give our customers flexibility to collect and check out the ‘basket' they created by communicating with a salesperson or through the real-time Retail Pro Prism POS system."

 

Customers can fill up their shopping cart online. If they are in the area, they might choose to visit a nearby Justice store and complete their purchase there.

 

Going Omnichannel with Retail Pro Prism

 
Retailers pursuing omnichannel are taking on the monumental task of integrating all their data sources into a 360 degree view of their business.

With full integrability in the Retail Pro platform, omnichannel is becoming attainable reality rather than simply rhetoric.

Accurate, real-time communications in Retail Pro help you keep your inventory and customer information up to date across the entire business, so you can make better decisions from holistic, integrated business insights.

Whether you’re leveraging Retail Pro for your brand stores, ecommerce, kiosks, outlets, franchises, store-in-store, or pop-ups, Retail Pro is one solution for all your retail and helps you unify commerce in a way that puts shoppers first.

 

To see what it will take to unify commerce with Retail Pro Prism in your business, contact your Retail Pro Business Partner or request a demo today.

Seamless Middle East 2018 energized retail with omnichannel customer experience focus

 

 

Seamless Middle East 2018, was hosted last week at Dubai International Convention Centre, bringing together the industry’s leaders in commerce, fintech, retail and payments at the Middle East's most inspiring summit and technology exhibition.

H.H. Lt. General Sheikh Saif bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Interior inaugurated the show, where over 350 global players and entrepreneurs showcased their latest products and solutions.

Technologies included the market’s top players in mobile POS, inventory management, mobile payments, and analytics, as well as digital marketing with omnichannel retailing, blockchain and AI.

 

IMG_8484

 

Speaker sessions featured discussion on Middle East retail’s current trends and key opportunities, including the latest technologies for creating seamless omnichannel customer experiences.

Consumer expectations for their shopping experiences have shifted significantly toward convenience – shopping with retailers on their own terms. So retailers are acting fast to adapt operations and adopt modern technologies that will help them launch their customers experience strategy innovations.

 

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One of the biggest retail players exhibiting at the show, Retail Pro International, showcased its globally proven and completely localized, flexible mobile and desktop POS and inventory management software.

Retail Pro International was joined by some of its expert support partners from Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and UAE – Inditech, Retail Technologies, Retail Information Systems, and Crystal Mind. Together with solutions partners Xretail omnichannel platform, Qwikcilver gift cards, and Darwin fashion retail planning, Retail Pro International made a strong case for the end-to-end retail offering.

 

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Darwin fashion retail planner

 

“We are pleased to have been serving serious retailers with the complete Retail Pro software platform, which is built on 30 years’ experience in specialty retail, and designed specifically for their needs,” commented Retail Pro International CEO, Kerry Lemos. “We know retail, and we specialize in it to help retailers achieve their operational and customer experience strategies. We have been partnering with retailers across the region for many years and are proud to say that the emergence of mobility and unified commerce in the Arab world is well supported by Retail Pro.”

 

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Today, 9000 special retailers – with over 450 based in the Middle East – use Retail Pro to improve efficiency in their store operations and add globally on-trend capabilities.

The POS software is adapted for local KPIs and market knowledge, making Retail Pro the go-to solution for top retailers in the Middle East.

 

unified commerce with Retail Pro

 

With Retail Pro, retailers can create consistent, impactful customer experiences and improve efficiency at every store, as well as:

  • Achieve seamless omnichannel operations by integrating all their retail technologies with Retail Pro, including SAP and other ERPs, loyalty, marketing, accounting, payments, and any other software
  • Streamline IT management with one single software for mPOS and fixed POS, available on the retailer’s choice of iOS, Windows, and Android mobile, laptop, and desktop devices
  • Easily manage complex tax scenarios, as Retail Pro software already comes equipped with customizable settings for VAT methods and over 15 years of proven track record of supporting VAT, sliding tax, and other complex taxation methods prevalent across the globe
  • Get actionable data with real-time visibility into sales performance at all levels of business, whether single brand or multiple-concept franchising models
  • Increase sales and customer loyalty by issuing and tracking fully-integrated gift cards, gift certificates and store credit across the entire chain
  • And much more

 

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“Middle East retail is quickly moving toward modernization, and top performers are choosing proven software to help them reach the next level – Retail Pro,” said Retail Pro International VP of EMEAA, Bevin Manian. “With our expert value-added resellers supporting retailers’ technology needs, Middle East retail is well-positioned to build their exact strategy and achieve growth.”

Enterprise retailers like Al-Haddad, Robinsons, Puma, Under Armour, MUJI, Pepe Jeans, and Adidas – to name a few – are all building their unique retail strategies on the robust Retail Pro platform.

 

See Retail Pro in action

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